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Ophthalmology Services

Cataracts

If you develop a cataract, you’ll notice a clouding of the lens in your eye, affecting your vision which will gradually become more blurred. You can get a cataract in one or both eyes.  

Cataracts are mostly associated with aging, called age-related cataracts, and this causes your lens to harden and become cloudy. People with diseases including diabetes might be more prone to developing cataracts.

Cataracts can also be: congenital (present at birth), traumatic (due to an injury to your eye) and drug induced (steroids).

If your cataract is hampering your daily activities and lifestyle, then surgery will be recommended. Cataract surgery is frequently performed and is a quick and straightforward procedure that’s effective in the majority of patients.  

At Winfield Hospital we use the technique called phacoemulsification. It involves replacing your lens with a small plastic lens. We use multifocal lenses and toric intraocular lenses to correct astigmatism.

Blocked tear ducts

Your tear duct is the pathway that carries your tears from the surface of the eye into the nose. It can become partially or completely blocked preventing your tears from draining away normally. Your tears flow onto your cheek and your eye becomes watery and irritated. Other symptoms are: redness of the white part of your eye, pain and swelling around the inside corner of your eye, recurrent eye infection, pus discharge from your eyes and crusting of your eyelids.

Some people are born with a blocked tear duct. Others develop it as an adult after an injury, tumour or infection.

Treatment depends on the blockage cause. Antibiotics will most likely be recommended if it’s due to a long-term infection. Surgery is often used to restore normal tear drainage. Tiny tubes, called stents, are used to open the tear duct passageway. Alternatively, your surgeon may create a new channel from the tear sac to the inside of your nose to allow your tears to bypass the blocked part of your tear duct. This is called dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) and it’s a common surgical procedure for blocked tear ducts.

Excision of Meibomian cysts

Meibomian glands are the sebaceous glands in your eyelids. They produce the greasy part of your tears to stop them evaporating too quickly. When a Meibomian gland becomes blocked, it swells up because the grease can’t get away. A firm and round lump then forms on your eyelid, known as a Meibomian cyst or chalazion. These cysts are most often found on your upper eyelid.

Often the blocked gland becomes inflamed or infected causing the Meibomian cyst to become red and sore. The cyst may press on your eye and blur your vision.

Meibomian cysts usually get better without the need for treatment. However, if your cyst remains for weeks or months the minor surgery may be recommended. This is called incision and curettage and is typically performed under local anaesthetic. During the procedure a small cut is made on the inside of your eyelid and the cyst contents are removed.

Entropion eyelid treatment

Entropion happens when your lower eyelid rolls inwards and causes eye lashes to irritate the front of your eye and your eye becomes watery and uncomfortable. It’s an age related eye problem that mainly affects the lower eyelid of one or both eyes.

For mild entropion eye drops are usually recommended.

Severe entropion can be painful and cause damage to the cornea and can result in vision loss. Your ophthalmology consultant will advise surgery if your entropion is causing you distress or if it could cause a risk to your eye’s health. Lid surgery is performed under local anaesthetic as a day case procedure for an entropion.